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How do i engage teengers to read self help books inoder to be inspired to be better

How do i engage teengers to read self help books inoder to be inspired to be better
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Self-help books are just one way to help people become inspired to reach their full potential. What books are you offering the kids you work with? Are there other ways to teach them the ideas you hope they learn from those books? I wonder if you might not need to work to develop a book that speaks specifically to Ugandan youth and their experiences.

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Answered about 2 years ago tallybower 289 3 from United States

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Here are some great  articles on the subject and a self-help book by Dr. Christine Barrett Whelan that they'll want to read! 

Dr. Whelan conducted her doctoral research at Oxford on the self-help industry. She is a behavioral-change sociologist, a sociology professor at the University of Pittsburgh, and author of Generation WTF: From “What the #%$&?” to a Wise, Tenacious and Fearless You -- a self-help book The Templeton Report calls a “Road Map for a Lost Generation.” The book won the backing of the John Templeton Foundation (a philanthropic organization dedicated to supporting rigorous scientific and scholarly research) because, as Templeton Press Editor-In-Chief Susan Arellano explains, it is consistent with Sir John Templeton’s vision “to make science and new spiritual information accessible so individuals and societies can live better lives.”

Dr. Whelan gives a detailed explanation of “Why most self-help books suck, and why this one is different” in a series of three blog posts on the Generation WTF website (which, like the book, is geared to 18-25 year-olds) - exposing what she calls, “the 9 Dirty Secrets of the Self-Help Industry.” The posts, respectively, are: “Why Most Self-Help Books Suck ,” “Why Most Self-Help Books Suck, Part 2,” and “Why Most Self-Help Books Suck, Part 3.”  The information is an eye-opener.

Answered almost 2 years ago exdir1 143 from United States

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